Rangers lead the way with LGBT+ education

Fri 16th November 2018

School children in Glasgow are amongst the first to receive LGBT+ inclusive education, thanks to a new programme from the Rangers Charity Foundation.

‘Diversity Wins’, which was launched with the support of Glasgow City Council’s Employment and Skills Partnership team, aims to promote equality between young people and follows last week’s Government announcement that all Scotland schools are to formally recognise the issues faced by the LGBT+ community, as part of the curriculum.

The programme focuses on interactive anti-sectarianism and LGBT+ awareness sessions and is delivered out of the Ibrox Community Hub to 600 primary 7 pupils. It was launched on Friday 9 November with a visit from Head of Rangers Women FC and former Captain of Scotland, Amy McDonald.

Workshops have been designed to break down barriers between young people from different backgrounds, promote anti-bullying and motivate pupils to share the messages they have learned with families and friends.

In last week’s announcement, the Government confirmed that all state schools will be supported to teach LGBT+ equality and inclusion across different age groups. This will include teaching of LGBT+ terminology and identities, tackling homophobia and prejudice, and the history of the equalities movement.

Rangers Charity Foundation Director, Connal Cochrane, said: “Working to improve diversity and inclusion within the community is a key focusfor us and we are hoping to make a meaningful difference with our new programme, ‘Diversity Wins’.

“We’re very proud to be one of the first organisations in the UK to be delivering set programmes focused on LGBT+ inclusive education for primary pupils, and we hope to see similar sessions develop across the country, thanks to the new curriculum legislation.”

Councillor Chris Cunningham, City Convener for Education, Skills and Early Years said: “This partnership project is a great opportunity for our young people and this inclusive education work complements Glasgow’s LGBT+ learning across the city being developed and delivered by equality staff in our schools.”

Deputy Head Teacher for Gowanbank Primary and LCR, Scott Mowat, helped to develop workshops for ‘Diversity Wins’. He said: “Working with Rangers Charity Foundation to develop an LGBT+ education course, which meets the needs of the Scottish Government’s recent announcement, is a great way of giving primary aged children a simple yet effective understanding of LGBT+ people in society and sport.

“Prejudice-based bullying of LGBT+ people in schools is still worryingly high and the suicide rate amongst youth needs addressed. Young people learning about LGBT+ issues within the context of equality and diversity goes someway into opening discussion around this area; with the aim to reduce bullying and the stigma that can sometimes be attached to LGBT+ in sport.

“All young people should be free to learn in Scotland without worrying about their gender, sexuality, race or religion and it is fantastic that Rangers Charity Foundation is putting all of this together in a one day module to reduce inequality for all.”

The Rangers Charity Foundation is the official charity for Rangers Football Club and works to improve the lives of people across Scotland and around the globe, via a range of community programmes and charity partnerships. 

Tags: Diversity / inclusion / ibrox pride / LGBT